...stuff I do and things I like...

Tuesday, October 24 2017

Mobile Security News Update October 2017

Conferences
    PacSec Nov 1-2, Tokyo, Japan. Grandma's old bag, how outdated libraries spoil Android app security by Marc Schoenefeld. When encryption is not enough: Attacking Wearable - Mobile communication over BLE by Kavya Racharla. The Art of Exploiting Unconventional Use- after-free Bugs in Android Kernel by Di Shen.

    DeepSec Nov 14-17, Vienna, Austria. Normal Permissions In Android: An Audiovisual Deception by Constantinos Patsakis.

    Black Hat Europe 2017 Dec 4-7, London, UK. ATTACKING NEXTGEN ROAMING NETWORKS by Daniel Mende, Hendrik Schmidt. ATTACKS AGAINST GSMA'S M2M REMOTE PROVISIONING by Maxime Meyer. BLUEBORNE - A NEW CLASS OF AIRBORNE ATTACKS THAT CAN REMOTELY COMPROMISE ANY LINUX/IOT DEVICE by Ben Seri, Gregory Vishnepolsky. DIFUZZING ANDROID KERNEL DRIVERS by Aravind Machiry, Chris Salls, Jake Corina, Shuang Hao, Yan Shoshitaishvili. HOW SAMSUNG SECURES YOUR WALLET AND HOW TO BREAK IT by HC MA. INSIDE ANDROID'S SAFETYNET ATTESTATION by Collin Mulliner, John Kozyrakis. JAILBREAKING APPLE WATCH by Max Bazaliy. RO(O)TTEN APPLES: VULNERABILITY HEAVEN IN THE IOS SANDBOX by Adam Donenfeld.


Quick conference review: both 44con and ekoparty were great. Ekoparty was especially awesome since I got to check the last continent off my list. Also the size of ekoparty was way beyond what I was expecting. They managed to have a really good conference that is professionally run while stilling maintaining the vibe of a hacker / underground con <3

Two weeks ago there was a post on Medium about two companies that provide a mobile identification service. That service basically can be used to convert your phone's IP address into real information about the owner of the phone (the contract owner). This is done via APIs that are provided by multiple Mobile Network Operators (such as AT&T). The medium article linked to demo pages of those two service providers (payfone and danal inc) that show not only your phone number but also your operator's name, your name and address.

I played with the two demo sites for a bit (while they were still online - offline now). I'm on Google Fi with a number proted from T-Mobile (pre-paid). Payfone only had my phonenumber and old carrier (T-Mobile) while Danal inc showed no data at all. I never provided any data to T-Mobile since it is not required for a pre-paid card. Google has all the data but likely does not share it with 3rd parties.

Overall this is a service that I really don't want to exist. I don't want an abritary company to be able to identify me while visiting their website from my mobile phone. I hope those companies don't just sell their services to anybody. Read the Medium article again: AT&T consumer choice opt-out doesn't affect this!

iOS 11 the tragedy continues: 11.0 had a bunch of flaws that were annyoing. Now 11.0.3 randomly frezzes my phone for minutes. Also I have some issues with voice call audio not working sometimes. Highly disaspointing!

Pictures of the month:






Links

Monday, September 25 2017

Biometrics and Smartphones

since I always rant about how I don't like biometrics in smartphones some people have asked me to formulate what I actually would like to see to happen in this area.

My dislike for biometrics is that you cannot change your password anymore because your password is your finger, eye (iris), or face. That means you basically show you password to everybody. A good example of this is here: Politician's fingerprint 'cloned from photos' by hacker.

The second part of the problem is that many biometric systems can be easily bypassed, some face recognition systems even with a picture shown on a smartphone screen.

My main issue is that biometric systems can be bypassed by forcing the owner of the device to unlock it. This can be done without leaving evidence, a funny example of this issue: 7-Year-Old Boy Uses Sleeping Dad's Finger To Unlock iPhone. Also see this interesting case: Court rules against man who was forced to fingerprint-unlock his phone.

The main argument I always hear is that people who wouldn't set a password (or use just a simple PIN) are using biometrics and therefore are more secure now with the help of biometrics. The kid from the previous story wasn't stopped by biometrics it was just as good as not having a password.

What would have stopped the kid from unlocking his dad's phone? A simple timeout! Basically what I want to see is a timeout for your biometrics. Once you entered your password you can unlock your phone using biometrics, after a specific amount of time you have to re-enter your password and cannot unlock the device using biometrics. With a timeout of say 30 minutes to one hour you can prevent simple attacks while still being able to use the convenience of biometrics. Apple recently introduced the SOS mode that will also disable biometric authentication until you enter your password. I wish this was taken one step further and let you set a timeout.

I personally see biometrics on a smartphone as a pure convenience feature and treat it as a weak security feature. I only use it for ApplePay.

I think it is pretty bad to get people used to biometric authentication, Apple may get it right but other companies wont. Normal users can't determine this easily. Also how much did the additional hardware components cost to implement fingerprint authentication or face recognition. FaceID doesn't use a normal camera so there are definitely additional costs that you as the user have to pay for this convenience feature.

Face recognition in consumer products also gets people to accept this as an normal everyday thing and thus helps the argument for face recognition being used in surveillance.

/rant

References:

Tuesday, September 19 2017

Mobile Security News Update September 2017

Conferences
    ekoparty Sep 27-29, Buenos Aires. Blue Pill for your phone by Oleksandr Bazhaniuk. Unbox Your Phone - Exploring and Breaking Samsung's TrustZone Sandboxes by Daniel Komaromy. Inside Android's SafetyNet Attestation: Attack and Defense by Collin Mulliner. How to cook Cisco: Exploit Development for Cisco IOS by George Nosenko. Bypass Android Hack by Marcelo Romero.

    Virus Bulletin 4-6 Oct, Madrid Span. Last-minute paper: Publishing our malware stats by Jason Woloz (Google) [This is about Android Malware]. Android reverse engineering tools: not the usual suspects by Axelle Apvrille.
Some comments on BlueBorne: I've been involved with Bluetooth security since like forever (not active in the last 10+ years). The early Bluetooth vulnerabilities were mostly logic bugs and issues such as missing authentication. Bluetooth devices could not be set to hidden and would always show up when scanning for devices. Stuff like that. BlueBorne is different as it is a remote exploitable memory corruption vulnerability in Linux, Android, and Windows. This is quite a novelty since we haven't seen a bug that is more ore less the same on two platforms. Even more interesting is that this bug is pre-authentication and gives you kernel privileges (code exec in the kernel).

In theory this set of vulnerabilities can be bad, bad. In practice the issue is much less of an issue. Exploit mitigations and built variances help mitigating the risk. Devices are not always visible therefore the attacker cannot easily find your device and attack it.

Also see: Hackers Could Silently Hack Your Cellphone And Computers Over Bluetooth.

FaceID: I think it is a really horrible idea! Do not put biometric systems in to consumer products ever! I will not buy products with mandatory biometrics so far iOS allows me to turn it off and use a passphrase - thats why I even consider buying iOS devices. I hate this change -- biometrics are bad.

Pics:


I agree ^^^



Links

Tuesday, August 22 2017

Mobile Security News Update August 2017

Conferences
    toorcon san diego Aug 28th - Sep 3rd. Dig Deep into FlexiSpy for Android by Kai Lu(@k3vinlusec).

    HITB Singapore August 21-25. The Original Elevat0r - History of a Private Jailbreak by Stefan Esser. The Nightmare of Fragmentation: A Case Study of 200+ Vulnerabilities in Android Phones by BAI GUANGDONG and ZHANG QING.

    Tencent Security Conference, August 30-31. Pointer Authentication by Robert James Turner. Finding iOS vulnerabilities in an easy way by Tiefel Wang and Hao Xu. Bare-metal program tracing on ARM by Ralf-Philipp Weinmann.

    44con 13-15 September London, UK. Inside Android's SafetyNet Attestation: What it can and can't do lessons learned from a large scale deployment by Collin Mulliner.

    BalCCon2k17 Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia. September 15-17. Mobile phone surveillance with BladeRF by Nikola Rasovic.

    T2 October 26-27 Helsinki, Finland. Breaking Tizen by Amihai Neiderman.

    DeepSec Vienna 13-17 November. Normal permissions in Android: An Audiovisual Deception by Constantinos Patsakis. How secure are your VoLTE and VoWiFi calls? by Sreepriya Chalakkal.
Quick Conference Review
    It was good to see everybody in Vegas, even better meeting new people. Especially some folks I wanted to meet for a long time. I had a good time at WOOT, meeting old friends was especially good. Maybe it helped that it was in the CanSecWest hotel. I link a few relevant papers below.

Stefan Esser is running a kickstarter for an iOS Kernel Exploitation Training Course for Development of a freely available online iOS kernel exploitation training course based on iOS 9.3.5 on 32 bit devices. If you are into iOS security you should support Stefan's project!


Ralf is on point as usual:
Pictures of the month:



Links

Saturday, August 05 2017

RE-Canary: Detecting Reverse Engineering with Canary Tokens

This blog post is to provide some more details about my idea that was mentioned on Risky Business #463 by Haroon Meer.

What are Canary Tokens (from Thinkst).
    You'll be familiar with web bugs, the transparent images which track when someone opens an email. They work by embedding a unique URL in a page's image tag, and monitoring incoming GET requests.

    Imagine doing that, but for file reads, database queries, process executions, patterns in log files, Bitcoin transactions or even Linkedin Profile views. Canarytokens does all this and more, letting you implant traps in your production systems rather than setting up separate honeypots.
    ...
    Canary tokens are a free, quick, painless way to help defenders discover they've been breached (by having attackers announce themselves.)


The idea: Embed Canary Tokens into binaries (or application data) to help identify reverse engineering of your software.

Every reverse engineer looks for unique information (often just strings) in the target binary to help understand it. The strings are thrown into Google (or other search engines) with the hope to get additional information. The returned information can be extremely helpful to determine what the software is, what other code is linked in, what versions, etc. Everybody who reverse engineers stuff does this! I personally don't reverse engineer for a living so I asked around to confirm that professionals actually do this (I already knew the answer anyway!).

The plan:
  • Embed unique looking strings into the binary
  • Stand-up web page that contains the string, log access to that page (alert on access)
  • Make Google crawl that page (various tools for that)
  • Ship software

This is pretty straight forward, right? But do you care about somebody who just ran strings on your binary? Likely not! So what's next?

Many applications protect their code and other assets that come with it through different kinds of methods (called obfuscation techniques for this article - even not all of it will be actual obfuscation). The next step for the RE-canaries is to generate canaries and embed them into each obfuscation layer. If someone accesses a more obfuscated canary you know that a certain level of effort was put into reversing your app. This part is really where the creativity of the RE-canary deployment comes into play. This will be highly depended on the specific software, on the protection mechanisms used, the language and framework that app is written in and so on. Mobile apps (I'm a mobile app guy, yeah!) contain API endpoints and URLs and maybe some hardcoded credentials (tokens of course). The URLs have the advantage that you wouldn't need to put up a website. You just make them accessible and add logging and alerting.

The final part of this is automation. You want to automate canary creation and embedding into your built process, so that you can generate unique canaries with each built or major release or whatever fits your software.

In the end it will likely happen that advanced REs are going to use an anonymization service such as TOR when searching for strings or trying out URLs (specifically for URLs!). In this case at least you will know that someone is looking at your stuff and passed a certain skill/time/effort threshold, which I guess in most cases is enough information.

That's it! This idea was inspired heavily by Haroon Meer's Canarytokens a great free service that I use once in awhile!

Comments and feedback is welcome via the usual channels.

Thursday, July 13 2017

Mobile Security News Update July 2017

Conferences
    Black Hat USA Las Vegas, July 26-27. ALL YOUR SMS & CONTACTS BELONG TO ADUPS & OTHERS by Angelos Stavrou, Azzedine Benameur, Ryan Johnson. NEW ADVENTURES IN SPYING 3G AND 4G USERS: LOCATE, TRACK & MONITOR by Altaf Shaik, Andrew Martin, Jean-Pierre Seifert, Lucca Hirschi, Ravishankar Borgaonkar, Shinjo Park. SS7 ATTACKER HEAVEN TURNS INTO RIOT: HOW TO MAKE NATION-STATE AND INTELLIGENCE ATTACKERS' LIVES MUCH HARDER ON MOBILE NETWORKS by Martin Kacer, Philippe Langlois. FIGHTING TARGETED MALWARE IN THE MOBILE ECOSYSTEM by Andrew Blaich, Megan Ruthven. GHOST TELEPHONIST LINK HIJACK EXPLOITATIONS IN 4G LTE CS FALLBACK by Haoqi Shan, Jun Li, Lin Huang, Qing Yang, Yuwei Zheng. HONEY, I SHRUNK THE ATTACK SURFACE – ADVENTURES IN ANDROID SECURITY HARDENING by Nick Kralevich. DEFEATING SAMSUNG KNOX WITH ZERO PRIVILEGE by Di Shen. BLUE PILL FOR YOUR PHONE by Oleksandr Bazhaniuk, Yuriy Bulygin. CLOAK & DAGGER: FROM TWO PERMISSIONS TO COMPLETE CONTROL OF THE UI FEEDBACK LOOP by Chenxiong Qian, Simon Pak Ho Chung, Wenke Lee, Yanick Fratantonio.

    Defcon Las Vegas. Jailbreaking Apple Watch by Max Bazaliy. Inside the "Meet Desai" Attack: Defending Distributed Targets from Distributed Attacks by CINCVolFLT (Trey Forgety). macOS/iOS Kernel Debugging and Heap Feng Shui by Min(Spark) Zheng & Xiangyu Liu. Using GPS Spoofing to Control Time by David "Karit" Robinson. Phone System Testing and Other Fun Tricks by "Snide" Owen. Unboxing Android: Everything You Wanted To Know About Android Packers by Avi Bashan & Slava Makkaveev. Ghost in the Droid: Possessing Android Applications with ParaSpectre by chaosdata. Ghost Telephonist' Impersonates You Through LTE CSFB by Yuwei Zheng & Lin Huang. Bypassing Android Password Manager Apps Without Root by Stephan Huber & Siegfried Rasthofer. Man in the NFC by Haoqi Shan & Jian Yuan.

    USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies (WOOT) Vancouver Canada, 14-15 August. Shattered Trust: When Replacement Smartphone Components Attack by Omer Shwartz, Amir Cohen, Asaf Shabtai, and Yossi Oren. White-Stingray: Evaluating IMSI Catchers Detection Applications by Shinjo Park and Altaf Shaik, Ravishankar Borgaonkar, Andrew Marti, Jean-Pierre Seifert. fastboot oem vuln by Roee Hay.
Black Hat and Defcon have a really good number of mobile related talks this year.

It was a busy month and July will be even busier. I'll be at GSMA DSG, Black Hat and Defcon July and Usenix WOOT in mid August



Picture of month:


There is a lot happening in the Android boot loader world at the moment. I guess this is what happens when the devices get more and more locked down - people go after the root of trust.

Links:

Tuesday, June 06 2017

Mobile Security News Update June 2017

Conferences
    Black Hat USA July 26-27 Las Vegas. 'GHOST TELEPHONIST' LINK HIJACK EXPLOITATIONS IN 4G LTE CS FALLBACK by Haoqi Shan, Jun Li, Lin Huang, Qing Yang, Yuwei Zheng. ALL YOUR SMS & CONTACTS BELONG TO ADUPS & OTHERS by Angelos Stavrou, Azzedine Benameur, Ryan Johnson. BROADPWN: REMOTELY COMPROMISING ANDROID AND IOS VIA A BUG IN BROADCOM'S WI-FI CHIPSETS by Nitay Artenstein. CLOAK & DAGGER: FROM TWO PERMISSIONS TO COMPLETE CONTROL OF THE UI FEEDBACK LOOP by Chenxiong Qian, Simon Pak Ho Chung, Wenke Lee, Yanick Fratantonio. DEFEATING SAMSUNG KNOX WITH ZERO PRIVILEGE by Di Shen. FIGHTING TARGETED MALWARE IN THE MOBILE ECOSYSTEM by Andrew Blaich, Megan Ruthven. HONEY, I SHRUNK THE ATTACK SURFACE – ADVENTURES IN ANDROID SECURITY HARDENING by Nick Kralevich. NEW ADVENTURES IN SPYING 3G AND 4G USERS: LOCATE, TRACK & MONITOR by Altaf Shaik, Andrew Martin, Jean-Pierre Seifert, Lucca Hirschi, Ravishankar Borgaonkar, Shinjo Park. SONIC GUN TO SMART DEVICES: YOUR DEVICES LOSE CONTROL UNDER ULTRASOUND/SOUND by Aimin Pan, Bo Yang, Shangyuan LI, Wang Kang, Zhengbo Wang. SS7 ATTACKER HEAVEN TURNS INTO RIOT: HOW TO MAKE NATION-STATE AND INTELLIGENCE ATTACKERS' LIVES MUCH HARDER ON MOBILE NETWORKS by Martin Kacer, Philippe Langlois. THE FUTURE OF APPLEPWN - HOW TO SAVE YOUR MONEY by Timur Yunusov.

    (Black Hat has a very strong mobile security line up this year.)

    Defcon July 27-30 Las Vegas. Man in the NFC by Haoqi Shan & Jian Yuan. (speaker selection not final)

    MOSEC June, Shanghai added a bunch of talks (all mobile security related, obviously).

    Recon June 16-18 Montreal, Canada. FreeCalypso: a fully liberated GSM baseband by Mychaela Falconia. Hacking Cell Phone Embedded Systems by Keegan Ryan.
This took a long time again. It gets harder and harder do to this since this stuff is not directly what I do on a day to day basis currently.

The Qualcomm Mobile Security summit was excellent again! Fantastic talks and again I met a bunch of people I mostly knew from email and/or twitter or haven't seen in quite some time. This conference still is unparalleled!

I had a minute to play with the BlackBerry KeyOne and it feels like a super solid device. The screen is bigger then I thought it would be and this makes the device almost too big for my taste - but this is hard to say from playing with it for just a minute.

So iOS will finally support NDEF tags.
This talk is really interesting for anybody interested in mobile application security. This is not about mobile app reverse engineering but about app, backend, phone infrastructure interaction. Pictures of the month:





Links